Travel

Thanks for bearing with me, for  my almost full week of  existence on the web.  I’ve been trying my best to keep you intrigued.  Based upon your interests especially to my travel page I’ve added more descriptions and photos to some of the places I’ve visited. Enjoy- and keep reading!

Advertisements

Fonts Personified: Font Conference

Most people are familiar with the various fonts or type faces that you are able to choose from while you are working in Microsoft word, InDesign or any other word-processing or design software. You may even notice that each font has a little bit of character. That is why when I stumbled across the following video- I had to laugh and I had to share this with you! My favorite is Wingdings.

Tales in the Snow

Rabbit or butterfly? courtesy of Larry

Rabbit or butterfly? courtesy of Larry

I know its February, and if you’re living anywhere in a temperate climate zone you’re probably sick of all this white precipitation that seems to endlessly hang around. However, I challenge you to give snow a chance! I know it is the cause of wet shoes and socks and fish-tailing in your car but snow holds in itself a story. It is the daily story about the travels of critters around you. Yes, those fuzzy, puff-tailed squirrels, and chirping chickadees (if you are so lucky) that greet you on your morning walk to your car or to pick up the morning paper.

I probably would not have had such a fondness for snow if it wasn’t for my winter ecology class I took through the Audubon center about 3 years ago. There I learned about how to differentiate between the tracks of furry ground-dwellers from rabbits and martens to deer and wolves. I also learned about the different gaits of animals so not only could I tell what the animal was but also how fast  it was traveling. I could also tell if they were traveling with a companion or on its way to safety of a nearby tree.

So enjoy the last remaining month(s) of winter and see if you have any tales in your snow!

If you have further interest in tracking check out the following title:

Tracking & the Art of Seeing: How to Read Animal Tracks and Sign by Paul Rezendes

Otter tracks courtesy of Larry

Otter tracks courtesy of Larry

Look what Max can do!

The TECHNOLOGY behind computer generated imagery is amazing! Oftentimes I ask myself is that real or CG? There are so many different computer programs out there to create such imagery, however, for this post I will focus on one of the programs that I have had quite a bit of experience using to give you the basic idea of CG imagery-Autodesk’s 3ds max. It’s a great program for modeling, texturing, lighting, and animating. In this program you are able to take primitive objects (such as a square, cone, or sphere) and pretty much change it into anything you would want. Using deforming tools (scale, rotate, shift) you are able to manipulate the object’s vertices, edges, and faces and using other modifiers (bend, squeeze, smooth, and stretch) affect the overall appearance of an object. It’s digital sculpting! Once you have the shape modeled you are able to apply various textures to its surface to make it more life-like. Once this is done or during this process you can add lighting to bring out the form of the object (true lighting, in my opinion, is what can make your image really come to life). Tell the program to “take a picture of the scene” or “render” and hopefully only a few minutes later you’ll have your CG image.

blogmaxfake01

primitive object

blogmaxfake02

scaling primitive

textured primitive

textured primitive

lighting primitive

lighting primitive

Rendered primitive

Rendered primitive

Go to this link to see if you can tell the difference between a photo and a CG image: http://area.autodesk.com/index.php/fakeorfoto/

Hello world!

Love at first sight

Welcome! This is the first entry for Artemisia tridentata. I’m sure you’re curious about the name of this newly up-sprung blog so I shall not keep it from you. It actually comes from the genus species name of my favorite small tree/bush the Sagebrush. I was first introduced to my photosynthesizing friend on my travels out west (United States) where its pungent fragrance and silvery, three-lobed leaves caught my attention. It was love at first sight!


Besides my love of all things living, the subsequent entries will give you an eclectic taste of adventure, other scientific topics, and art from the perspective of a graduate student.


Enjoy – and feel free to leave a comment!